Orange you glad I didn’t say dust storm?

 

Orange you glad I didn't say dust storm?

In bichromatic news, the government of China began its first large-scale deployment of orange across the country, as part of a national effort to add color to the gray nation.

The brightest color in almost two decades hit Gansu province (above) in northwest China on Wednesday, bringing a sunnier tone to an otherwise drab spring sandstorm.

The Jinquan City Monochromatical Centre issued a red alert — the highest frequency of visible light possible — and forecast that visibility of the color orange would extend as far as 164 feet (500,000,000,000 angstroms) on Wednesday evening.

Efforts to brighten up the otherwise drab nation had come to a standstill since the first Kryptonian sunrise over Beijing, but after recent experiments by the late Chinese lunar probe Yutu resulted in last week’s massive color event on the Moon, the Chinese Ministry of Color decided to move ahead with its chromafication plans.

Early color research at Peking University focused primarily on primary colors, like red and yellow, but these turned out to be prohibitively expensive to spread evenly over a nation the size of China.  So the Ministry of Color decided to combine the efforts, sending out color engineers in red and yellow helmets to ride around on Crow T. Robot scooters (below) and toss orange debris in front of Beijing’s grey-and-white morning traffic to see if drivers would notice the bright obstacles before crashing into them. The results are still being analyzed.

Sandstorm2

One man, who was granted anonymity because he lived on the Yellow River, stared at the orange color as it gradually changed from a Mandarin orange in the morning into a dark ochre after sunset. “Suddenly it became dark, and I can’t tell whether it’s day or night,” he said shortly before looking at his watch and going to bed.

The Centre predicts the sky will fade to black by Thursday night.

(Click on the marmalade skies to read the original story.)

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